A Little Commentary If You Don’t Mind

I can’t exactly say when I met Darrell and his wife Trish, I’m guessing it was either the PTG or coaching youth sports 20 or so years ago; or maybe it was a certain Santa that had a familiar way about him as he handed out candy canes to elementary school kids after the school’s holiday program.

Our kids grew up together and have moved on with their own families and careers. Darrell and Trish were avid supports of both the school and the library as well as all the associated activates, fund raisers, and programs – but most of all they were just good friends and neighbors to many of Stamford’s residents. Sadly, Trish was called home but her energy, her enthusiasm, and concern for nature and the environment will always be with us. It is my hope that the Stamford Community Garden will finally and officially be named in Trish’s honor.

I write these words because last night at the Fire Dept monthly business meeting, Darrell sat in the Secretary’s chair taking notes – illegible to anyone but himself; a chair that he has occupied for past 21 of his 25 years with the dept – It was also Darrell’s last night in that chair.

At the conclusion of our meeting Chief Ethier expressed his praise and gratitude to the man who has sat next to him for nearly every monthly meeting for all those years. Darrell was presented with a commemorative gift which, no matter how appreciative we are of Darrell, will always pale in comparison to what Darrell and his family have given to the community of Stamford.

Good luck, take care, and full speed ahead old friend!

 

Illegal Dumping and Burning

Early Monday morning, May 1st, Stamford Fire Chief Paul Ethier was alerted to a smoldering burn pile on Risky Ranch Road. Upon arriving, the Chief found what appears to be several illegal burn piles and garbage strewn about. Vermont State police and the Stamford Selectboard have been informed of the issue. The Facebook post on Stamford Fire Dept page has received 15,000 views and over 140 shares. Burlington Vt news even picked up the story.

People who do this sort of thing are mostly likely thinking the have found an inexpensive way to dispose of unwanted materials. What probably doesn’t enter their mind are the possible ramifications of their “victimless” crimes.

The fire could get away from them and spread throughout woods, possibly burning down someone’s camp or summer home. Equally troubling would be if the fire department where called to respond up on the mountain. A all volunteer department is always short on staff, particularly during the weekday hours. If all it’s resources are directed 20 or 30 minutes away for an illegal burn and someone in town is in need of assistance, that assistance is either going to be delayed while the manpower and equipment comes down off the mountain; or be delayed while mutual aid from another town is called in to respond.

What starts out as an quick, cheap way for someone to get rid of unwanted materials could actually cost someone their life as men and equipment are redirected from farther away.

If you have any information that may help in the investigation of these illegal burns and garbage dumps, please call the Vermont State Police – their website and found number can be found on our contacts page.