Going Zero Waste with Amy Johns

Please join us May 11 at 6:30 p.m. for a library program and a community event that could have positive impacts on all of us and our town.

Amy Johns, Stamford resident and Director of the Zilkha Center for Environmental Initiatives at Williams College, will talk about ways to achieve a waste-free lifestyle.

Amy, who teaches courses on renewable energy and sustainability at Williams, will discuss the concept of Zero Waste living and outline strategies aimed at reducing waste and pollution in our lives and becoming better stewards of our environment.

The hour-long program will include time for discussion and light refreshments.

Act 46

May 10, 2017 – Last night a very informative School Board meeting was held with the main topic being the upcoming merger vote for the passage of Act 46 in the Town of Stamford. Several members of the school board, not enough to make a quorum, where present to try and answer every question thrown their way. Also on hand was Rep. Laura Sibilia as well as a group of concerned citizens who came forward with a well-research, well delivered presentation on an alternative to Act 46.

Act 46 is fast moving, still evolving piece of legislation, asking voters to make a decision before the ink on the final draft is dry is a recipe for disaster in my opinion. I will continue to follow this important decision for the residents of Stamford as more information is available to be made public.

Illegal Dumping and Burning

Early Monday morning, May 1st, Stamford Fire Chief Paul Ethier was alerted to a smoldering burn pile on Risky Ranch Road. Upon arriving, the Chief found what appears to be several illegal burn piles and garbage strewn about. Vermont State police and the Stamford Selectboard have been informed of the issue. The Facebook post on Stamford Fire Dept page has received 15,000 views and over 140 shares. Burlington Vt news even picked up the story.

People who do this sort of thing are mostly likely thinking the have found an inexpensive way to dispose of unwanted materials. What probably doesn’t enter their mind are the possible ramifications of their “victimless” crimes.

The fire could get away from them and spread throughout woods, possibly burning down someone’s camp or summer home. Equally troubling would be if the fire department where called to respond up on the mountain. A all volunteer department is always short on staff, particularly during the weekday hours. If all it’s resources are directed 20 or 30 minutes away for an illegal burn and someone in town is in need of assistance, that assistance is either going to be delayed while the manpower and equipment comes down off the mountain; or be delayed while mutual aid from another town is called in to respond.

What starts out as an quick, cheap way for someone to get rid of unwanted materials could actually cost someone their life as men and equipment are redirected from farther away.

If you have any information that may help in the investigation of these illegal burns and garbage dumps, please call the Vermont State Police – their website and found number can be found on our contacts page.